IGCSE English (First Language): Specimen Questions with Answers 15 - 18 of 34

Passage

Total mark: 20

Read the Passage A carefully, and then answer

Modern man remembers even telephone numbers. He remembers the addresses of his friends. He remembers the dates of good vintages. He remembers appointments for lunch and dinner. His memory is crowded with the names of actors and actresses and cricketers and footballers and murderers. He can tell you what the weather was like in a long-past August and the name of the provincial hotel at which he had a vile meal during the summer. In his ordinary life, again, he remembers almost everything that he is expected to remember.

As for myself, anyone who asks me to post a letter is a poor judge of character. Even if I carry the letter in my hand I am always past the first pillar-box before I remember that I ought to have posted it. Weary of holding it in my hand, I then put it for safety into one of my pockets and forget all about it. After that, it has an unadventurous life till a long chain of circumstances leads to a number of embarrassing questions being asked, and I am compelled to produce the evidence of my guilt from my pocket. This, it might be thought, must be due to a lack of interest in other people’s letters; but that cannot be the explanation, for I forget to post some even of the few letters that I myself remember to write.

As for leaving articles in trains and in taxies, I am no great delinquent in such matters. I can remember almost anything except books and walking-sticks and I can often remember even books. Walking sticks I find it quite impossible to keep. I have an old-fashioned taste for them, and I buy them frequently but no-sooner do I pay a visit to a friend’s house or go a journey in a train, than another stick is on its way into the world of the lost. I dare not carry an umbrella for fear of losing it. To go through life without ever having lost an umbrella- has even the grimmest— jawed umbrella-carrier ever achieved this?

The sportsmen have worse memories than their ordinary serious-minded fellows. A considerable number of footballs and cricket-bats, for instance, were forgotten. This is easy to understand, for boys, returning from the games, have their imaginations still filled with a vision of the playing-field, and their heads are among the stars — or their hearts in their boots — as they recall their exploits or their errors. They are abstracted from the world outside them. Memories prevent them from remembering to do such small prosaic things as take the ball or the bat with them when they leave the train. For the rest of the day, they are citizens of dreamland. Absent-mindedness of this kind seems to me all but a virtue. The absentminded man is often a man who is making the best of life and therefore has no time to remember the mediocre.

I have heard of a father who, having offered to take the baby out in a perambulator, was tempted by the sunny morning to pause on his journey and slip into a public-house for a glass of beer. Leaving the perambulator outside, he disappeared through the door of the saloon bar. A little later, his wife had to do some shopping which took her past the public-house, where to her horror, she discovered her sleeping baby. Indignant at her husband’s behavior, she decided to teach him a lesson. She wheeled away the perambulator, picturing to herself his terror when he would come out and find the baby gone. She arrived home, anticipating with angry relish the white face and quivering lips that would soon appear with the news that the baby had been stolen. What was her vexation, however, when just before lunch her husband came in smiling cheerfully and asking: “Well, my dear, what’s for lunch today? ” having forgotten all about the baby and the fact that he had taken it out with him. How many men below the rank of a philosopher would be capable of such absent-mindedness as this? Most of us, I fear, are born with prosaically efficient memories. If it were not so, the institution of the family could not survive in any great modern city.

Question number: 15 (8 of 8 Based on Passage) Show Passage

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One Liner Question▾

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Who are the citizens of dreamland’? Why?

Explanation

  • Sportspersons are the citizens of dreamland’.

  • It is because they have their imaginations filled with a vision of the playing field.

  • They are abstracted from the world outside them.

Passage

Reading Comprehension (CORE)

There are two questions in this paper. First question has 30 marks and Second question has 20 marks.

Total mark: 20

Section -1

Read the Passage A carefully, and then answer

Africa was once filed with an abundance of wild animals. But that is changing fast. One of these animals, the black rhinoceros, Lives on the plains of Africa. It has very poor eyesight and a very bad temper. Even though the black rhino is powerful, and can be dangerous, its strength can’t always be it to hunter some people think that the rhino’s horn has magical powers and many hunters kill rhinos for the valuable home. This has caused the black rhino to be placed on the endangered species list.

The elephant seems to represent all that is strong and wild in Africa. It once had no natural enemies, but is now endangered-killed for its ivory tusks. The fastest land animal, the cheetah, also lives in Africa. It too, is becoming extinct a people take over more and more of the land that is the cheetah’s natural habitat.

Imagine Africa without the powerful rhino, the gentle, Intelligent elephant, or the lightning quick cheetah, Once they are gone, they’re gone forever. Wherever people are careless about the land, there are endangered species.

Grizzly bears like to wander great distance. Bears need up to 1,500 square miles of territory to call it home. Today, because forests have been cleared to make room for people, the grizzly’s habitat is shrinking and the grizzly is disappearing. It joins other endangered North American animals, such as the red wolf and the American crocodile.

In South America, the destruction of the rain forest threatens many animals. Unusual mammals, such as the howler monkey and the three-toed sloth, are endangered Beautiful birds like the great green macaw and the golden parakeet are also becoming extinct. They are losing their homes in the rain forest, and thousands die when they are caught and shipped off to be sold as exotic pets.

The giant panda of Asia is a fascinating and unique animal. Yet there are only about 1,000 still Living in the wild. The giant panda’s diet consists mainly of the bamboo plant, so when the bamboo forest die, so don the panda China is now making an effort to protect these special creatures from becoming extinct.

Asia’s big cats are also in trouble. The exotic snow leopard lives high in the mountains. Even there, it faces the loss of its natural habitat and hunters who kill it for its fur. The tiger, the largest of all the big cats, is hunted merely for sport.

Sea animals are in danger of extinction as well. The blue whale is the largest animal in the world. It weighs up to 390.000 pounds. Whale hunting and pollution are these species greatest enemies.

Unfortunately, it is people who cause many of the problems that animals face. We alter and pollute their habitat. We hunt them for skin, tusks, furs, and home. We destroy animals that get in the way of farming or building. And we remove them from their natural habitats and take them home as pets.

What can you do to help endangered animals? Learn as much as you can about them. The more you know, the more you can help. Make an effort to support 200 and wildlife groups. Many zoos bred endangered animals, helping to ensure that they will continue to live on. Contribute to groups, such as the National Wildlife Federation, that works hard to protect animals. You can also be a smart shopper and never buy a pet that has been raised in the wilderness.

The world is made up of many living things and each thing is dependent on the others to survive. If we allow even one species on Earth to become extinct, it has an Impact on other living things and changes our world. When we mention any endangered wild animals, let’s hope that we never again have to say “Gone forever”.

Question number: 16 (1 of 8 Based on Passage) Show Passage

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Short Answer Question▾

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Why is the grizzly bear disappearing? (Marks 2)

Explanation

  • The forest where the grizzly bear lives is cleared to make room for people.

  • This leads to the shrinking of the bear’s natural habitat.

  • So the grizzly bear is fast disappearing.

Question number: 17 (2 of 8 Based on Passage) Show Passage

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Short Answer Question▾

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How is man responsible for the extinction of many animals? (Marks 2)

Explanation

  • Man hunts many animals for their skins, tusks, furs and horns.

  • He destroys them to make farms and buildings in their habitat.

  • He removes them from their natural habitats to keep them as pets.

Question number: 18 (3 of 8 Based on Passage) Show Passage

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Short Answer Question▾

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What happened when the rain forests were destroyed in South America? (Marks 2)

Explanation

  • When the rain forests were destroyed in South America the howler monkey and the three-toed sloth become endangered.

  • The macaw and the parakeet become extinct.