IGCSE English (First Language): Specimen Questions with Answers 161 - 163 of 179

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Passage

Passage-1

Music – The Hope Raiser

One of my parents՚ deepest fears, I suspect, is that society would not properly value me as a musician, that I wouldn՚t be appreciated. I had very good grades in high school, I was good in science and math, and they imagined that as a doctor or a research chemist or an engineer, I might be more appreciated than I would be as a musician. I still remember my mother՚s remark when I announced my decision to apply to music school. She said, ‘You՚re wasting your SAT scores!’ On some level, I think, my parents were not sure what the value of music was, what its purpose was. And they loved music: they listened to classical music all the time. They just weren՚t clear about its function. So, let me talk about that a little bit, because we live in a society that puts music in the “arts and entertainment” section of the newspaper. Serious music, the kind your kids are about to engage in, has absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with entertainment, in fact it՚s the opposite of entertainment. Let me talk a little bit about music, and how it works.

One of the first cultures to articulate how music really works was that of the ancient Greeks. And this is going to fascinate you: the Greeks said that music and astronomy were two sides of the same coin. Astronomy was the study of relationships between observable, permanent, external objects, and music was the study of relationships between invisible, internal, hidden objects.

Music has a way of finding the big, invisible moving pieces inside our hearts and souls and helping us figure out the position of things inside us. Let me give you some examples of how this works. One of the most profound musical compositions of all time is the “Quartet for the End of Time” written by a French composer Olivier Messiaen in 1940. Messiaen was 31 years old when France entered the war against Nazi Germany. He was captured by the Germans in June of 1940 and imprisoned in a prisoner-of-war camp.

He was fortunate to find a sympathetic prison guard who gave him paper and a place to compose, and was fortunate to have musician colleagues in the camp, a cellist, a violinist, and a clarinetist. Messiaen wrote his quartet with these specific players in mind. It was performed in January 1941 for four thousand prisoners and guards in the prison camp. Today it is one of the most famous masterworks in the Repertoire.

Given what we have since learned about life in the Nazi camps, why would anyone in his right mind waste time and energy writing or playing music? There was barely enough energy on a good day to find food and water, to avoid a beating, to stay warm, to escape torture-why would anyone bother with music? And yet-even from the concentration camps, we have poetry, we have music, we have visual art; it wasn՚t just this one fanatic Messiaen; many, many people created art. Why? Well, in a place where people are only focused on survival, on the bare necessities, the obvious conclusion is that art must be, somehow, essential for life. The camps were without money, without hope, without commerce, without recreation, without basic respect, but they were not without art. Art is part of survival; art is part of the human spirit, an unquenchable expression of who we are. Art is one of the ways in which we say, “I am alive, and my life has meaning.”

Question 161 (6 of 6 Based on Passage)

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Write in Brief

One Liner▾

Read the incident again and answer the following questions. (Marks 4)

How did Messiaen spend his time in prison?

Explanation

In prison, Messiaen spent his time composing and playing music. He wrote a music composition – “Quartet for the End of time.”

Passage

The Model Millionaire

Hughie was wonderfully good looking with his crisp brown hair, his clear-cut profile, and his grey eyes. He was as popular with men as he was with women, and he had every accomplishment except that of making money. He had tried everything. But he became nothing, a delightful, ineffectual young man with a perfect profile and no profession.

Hughie wanted to marry Laura Merton, the daughter of a retired Colonel. The Colonel was very fond of Hughie but would not hear of any engagement. “Come to me my boy, when you have got ten thousand pounds of your own and we will see about it,” he said. Hughie looked very glum and he cursed himself for his inability to fulfil the condition.

One morning as he was on his way to Holland Park, he dropped in to see a great friend of his, Alan Trevor. Trevor was a painter. He was a strange rough fellow with a freckled face and a red ragged beard.

When he took up the brush, he was a real master and his pictures were eagerly sought after.

When Hughie came in, he found Trevor painting the final additions to a wonderful life size picture of a beggar man. The beggar himself was standing on a platform in a corner of the studio. He was a wizened old man with a face like wrinkled parchment and a most piteous expression. Over his shoulders was flung a coarse brown cloak, all tears, and tatters; his thick boots were patched and cobbled and with one hand he leant on a rough stick while with the other he held out his battered hat for alms.

“What an amazing model!” whispered Hughie, as he shook hands withhis friend.

“An amazing model?” shouted Trevor at the top of his voice. “I should think so! Such beggars as he is not to be met with every day.”

“Poor old chap!” said Hughie, “how miserable he looks! But I suppose to youpainters, his face is his fortune?”

“Certainly, you don՚t want a beggar to look happy, do you?”

“How much does a model get for sitting?” asked Hughie.

“A shilling an hour.”

“And how much do you get for your picture, Alan?”

“Oh! For this I get two thousand pounds.”

After sometime, the servant came in and told Trevor that the frame maker wanted to speak to him. “Don՚t run away Hughie” he said, as he went out, “I՚ll be back in a moment.” The old beggar took advantage of Trevor՚s absence to rest for a moment on a wooden bench. He looked so forlorn that Hughie could not help pitying him. All he could find was a sovereign and some coppers.

“Poor old fellow,” he to himself and slipped the sovereign into the beggar՚s hand. The old man said, “Thank you sir.” Then Trevor arrived and Hughie took his leave.

The next day when Hughie visited Trevor, he was surprised to hear that the model kept asking Trevor for all details about him. Trevor informed Hughie that he had clearly explained Hughie՚s condition to the old model. “What! You told that old beggar all my private affairs?” cried Hughie looking very red and angry. “My dear boy,” said Trevor smiling, “that old beggar as you call him is one of the richest men in Europe. He is Baron Hausberg. He is a great friend of mine.”

“Good Heavens! I gave him a sovereign!” and he sank into an armchair. “Gave him a sovereign!” shouted Trevor and he burst into a roar of laughter.

“What will he think of me?” said Hughie. “Oh, my God! I could not make out why he was so interested to know all about you; but I see it all now. He will invest your sovereign for you, Hughie, pay you the interest every six months and have a capital story to tell after dinner,” commented Trevor.

The next morning as he was at breakfast, the servant brought him a card on which was written Baron Hausberg and Hughie told the servant to show the visitor up. An old gentleman came into the room. “I have come from Baron Hausberg,” he continued. “I beg sir, that you will offer him my apologies,” stammered Hughie.

“The Baron,” said the old gentleman with a smile, “has commissioned me to bring you this letter,” and he extended a sealed envelope, on which was written “A wedding present to Hugh Erskine – Hughie and Laura – from an ‘old beggar’ and inside was a cheque for ten thousand pounds.”

“Millionaire models” remarked Alan, “are rare enough, but by Joe! Model Millionaires are rarer still!”

Question 162 (1 of 7 Based on Passage)

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Short Answer▾

Attempt a character sketch of Hughie (Marks 25)

Explanation

Hughie: Hughie is a good-looking young man of great talent. He could not find a job and earn money. He loves Laura. But he must earn ten thousand pounds to marry her. Hughie also has a kind heart. When he sees a beggar, he helps him. Hughie is also a lucky man. The beggar whom he helped was the Baron, a rich man. The Baron understands the kind heart of Hughie. He sends money and helps Hughie to marry Laura. Hughie՚s pity for the beggar paid him dividends

Question 163 (2 of 7 Based on Passage)

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Write in Short

Short Answer▾

Did Hughie mistake the Baron for a beggar? What happened as a result? Comment on the role played by Alan Trevor in the story. (Marks 25)

Explanation

Hughie was a good-looking young man. He could not find a job and earn money. He loved Laura who was the colonel՚s daughter. The Colonel asked him to earn ten thousand pounds to marry her. One day he visited Trevor՚s studio and saw an old beggar model. He had a wizened face. He wore a torn cloak, patched boots, and battered hat. Hughie took pity and gave him a sovereign as alms. But the beggar was the Baron, a rich man in Europe. The next day, Trevor told him the truth. Hughie felt very sorry for his act. Hughie received an envelope with a cheque for ten thousand pounds. It was the Baron՚s wedding gift to Hughie and he was in great surprise. Alan Trevor plays an important role in the story. The Baron came to know from Trevor, Hughie՚s poor condition and his need for money to marry his sweet heart Laura. If Trevor had not shared about Hughie՚s life, he could not have got money. Trevor was a lucky friend. At last Hughie married Laura. The Baron is really a model millionaire to others.

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